Natural Solutions Clinical Support

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Herbs: Drug Interactions

Natural Blood Thinners – Gingko, Alpha Ortho, Fish Oils, Vitamin E.  Not to be used with Warfarin or Coumadin
Tryptophan or 5HTP – Do not use if individual is on an anti-depressant
Vitamin K should not be used with Coumadin/Warfarin
Ortho Phosphoric Acid - Naturally thins the blood, avoid taking long term with blood thinners

Licorice can elevate blood pressure if used long term

Chamomile

Uses: Chamomile is often used in the form of a tea as a sedative.

Reactions: Allergic reactions can occur, particularly in persons allergic to ragweed. Reported reactions include abdominal cramps, tongue thickness, tightness in the throat, swelling of the lips, throat and eyes, itching all over the body, hives, and blockage of the breathing passages. Close monitoring is recommended for patients who are taking medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Echinacea

Uses: Largely because white blood cells in the laboratory can be stimulated to eat particles, Echinacea has been used to boost the body's ability to fight off infection.

Reactions: The most common side effect is an unpleasant taste. Echinacea can cause liver toxicity because of the dumping of toxins.   It should be avoided in combination with other medications that can affect the liver [such as ketaconazole (Nizoral, Extina, Xolegel, Kuric), leflunomide (Arava), methotrexate (Rheumatrex), isoniazid (INH, Nydrazid, Laniazid)].

St. John's Wort

Uses: St. John's Wort is popularly used as an herbal treatment for depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders. It is technically known as Hypericum perforatum.

Reactions: The most common side effect has been sun sensitivity which causes burning of the skin. It is recommended that fair-skinned persons be particularly careful while in the sun. St. John's wort may also leave nerve changes in sunburned areas. This herb should be avoided in combination with other medications that can affect sun sensitivity [such as tetracycline/Achromycin, sulfa- containing medications, piroxicam (Feldene)]. St. John's wort can also cause headaches, dizziness, sweating, and agitation when used in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine (Prozac) and paroxetine (Paxil).

Garlic

Uses: Garlic has been used to lower blood pressure and cholesterol

Reactions: Allergic reactions, skin inflammation, and stomach upset have been reported. Bad breath is a notorious accompaniment. Studies in rats have shown decreases in male rats' ability to make sperm cells. Garlic may decrease normal blood clotting and should be used with caution in patients taking medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Feverfew

Uses: Most commonly used for migraine headaches.

Reactions: Feverfew can cause allergic reactions, especially in persons who are allergic to chamomile, ragweed, or yarrow. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve) or Motrin] can reduce the effect of feverfew. A condition called "post-feverfew syndrome" features symptoms including headaches, nervousness, insomnia, stiffness, joint pain, tiredness, and nervousness. Feverfew can impair the action of the normal blood clotting element (platelets). It should be avoided in patients taking medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Ginkgo Biloba

Uses: This herb is very popular as a treatment for dementia (a progressive brain dysfunction) and to improve thinking.

Reactions: Mild stomach upset and headache have been reported. Ginkgo seems to have blood thinning properties. Therefore, it is not recommended to be taken with aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve) or Motrin], or medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin). Ginkgo should be avoided in patients with epilepsy taking seizure medicines, such as phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), and phenobarbital.

Ginseng

Uses: Ginseng has been used to stimulate the adrenal gland, and thereby increase energy. It also may have some beneficial effect on reducing blood sugar in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Reactions: Ginseng can cause elevation in blood pressure, headache, vomiting, insomnia, and nose bleeding. Ginseng can also cause falsely abnormal blood tests for digoxin (Lanoxin) levels in persons taking the drug for heart disease. It is unclear whether ginseng may affect female hormones. Its use in pregnancy is not recommended. Ginseng may affect the action of the normal blood clotting element (platelets). It should be avoided in patients taking aspirin, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs [such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve) or Motrin], or medications to prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin). Ginseng may also cause headaches, tremors, nervousness, and sleeplessness. It should be avoided in persons with manic disorder and psychosis.

Ginger

Uses: Ginger has been used as a treatment for nausea and bowel spasms.

Reactions: Ginger may lead to blood thinning. It is not recommended to be taken with medications that prevent blood clotting (anticoagulants) such as warfarin (Coumadin).

Saw Palmetto

Uses: Saw palmetto has been most commonly used for enlargement of the prostate gland. Saw palmetto has also been touted as a diuretic and urinary antiseptic to prevent bladder infections.

Reactions: Saw palmetto can cause upset stomach.

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  • 17-Jul-2017
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